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. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers h
's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation.
-- laura trevelyan. searching for a better life outside syria, some pretty gee's find themselves in limbo, now fighting for basic needs. is there life beyond earth? we will tell you about the frigid spider. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. for 60 -- six days in egypt, the protesters have been demanding the president to give up his sweeping powers. the judge's claim the new president is seeking bloody revenge. as both sides digging in, is there any end in sight? >> pensions are rising between president morsi and the egyptian judiciary. some protests over him giving himself extensive new powers. the spokesman says the president has joined in the campaign against the court. >> the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized by any threat or blackmail, and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone come on a matter how forcible the pressure. we are ready to face this, whatever the consequences. >> meanwhile, the final draft of egypt's new constitution is said to be on the verge of completion. in tahri
have their only naval base outside the former soviet union in syria. ladies and gentlemen, the russians are a very big part of this problem. i would not assume that the united states is the main issue here. if the russians and the chinese play ball on this, this could've been resolved a long time ago. but my sense is pessimistic. my sense, it's probably too late to put humpty dumpty of syria back together again. it has festered too long. all of this time that something could have been done, pretty much nothing was done except to make the situation worse. all of the talk in the united nations, and elsewhere, and the talk of a cease-fire, these are not solutions. this is talk. it's too late. it's too unclear. it's too fractious. how many in this room could name the opposition? how many in this room have a clear view of who the opposition is? or will be? on a danger to the united states, to the gcc and others? do we know this? are we going to hand weapons to them? i remember a reporter from "the wall street journal" asking me as the revolution was going on in libya, whose the opposition, d
or together you'll find ♪that we are two-oo-oo, oo-oo-oo, oo-oo-oo, of a kind♪ >>> syria's opposition is getting more organized. they've named an official coalition ambassador to france. it's a move seen as critical to garnering more international support for their battle against syrian president bashar al awes yad. the op sfwligs group says more than 250 people have been killed and fighting in syria over just the past couple of days. "new york times" columnist nicolas krzysztof just returned from an assignment in syria and cmn's randikay e asked him how civil war is affecting the people and the people of neighboring countries. >> the humanitarian situation is getting worse. you already have 2.5 million people who have been kicked out of their homes, and, you know, winter is coming, and just the stories are just so heart breaking, randi. first her home was destroyed by a bomb, and then her husband disappeared, maybe shot by a sniper or arrested. nobody knows. so now she's gone from, you know, this nice, normal, middle class existence like you or me to living in a tent with her kids as
of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events and an undertaking producing a series of transition issues on key issues, and research staff and by outsi
now in syria, damascus international airport shut down. flights in and out are canceled. fierce fighting closed off the main road to the airport. these clashes happening as the country's internet goes dark and cell phone communication drops out. it's harder to post videos like this one. reportedly showing shelling in aleppo uploaded earlier today. in the past, the syrian government cut off access in an operation. but this is unprecedented. the military jet and two helicopters were shot down by rebels. now, takeovers at military bases given them a new arsenal of heavy weaponry. in this attack, they used rockets and as cnn's arwa damon reports, the rebels claiming this as a major victory. >> reporter: children on the back of a tractor made off with a sizable tangled lump of metal. what was all too often the cause of nightmares now a trophy of war. proudly shown off by this man. we want to take these pieces to show them to the other villages, he says. let them see what happened to these planes. everyone we speak to here describes the fear they felt any time they heard a jet overhea
. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that fighting intensifies much of syria's internet network has been cut. the government and opposition are blaming each other for the shutdown. whatever the truth, syria's regime is battling these men for its very survival. president assad's helicopters are being shot down. and even a mig jet was filmed tumbling from the sky. this rebel boasting that he's downed both a helicopter and a mig within 24 hours. these surface to air missiles
in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
people across syria are dealing with a nationwide internet blackout and a top official at the united nations has harsh words about the deadly civil war which has stretched on for more than a year. the details are next. and powerful storms are smacking the west coast with heavy rain and winds. ♪ [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do you have the coverage you need? open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. so don't wait. now's the time to get on a path that could be right for you... with unitedhealthcare medicare solutions. call today to learn about the kinds of coverage we offer, including aarp medicarecomplete plans insured through unitedhealthcare. these medicare advantage plans can combine parts a and b, your hospital and doctor coverage... with part d prescription drug coverage, and extra benefits... all in one complete plan... for a $0 monthly premium. no more than what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to cha
coming out of syria, video showing the aftermath of an air strike that purportedly hit a playground full of children. it comes as the assad regime launches a new wave of attacks across the country. we'll have an update from a photojournalist who just spent eight days inside syria straight ahead. ng this delicious could only come from nature. now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet be
was down today in syria and some traffic was halted at the airport in damascus as rebels battled government forces. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, margaret warner examines what the latest clashes tell us about the strength of the assad regime and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern danceo contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to
, on libya, syria, and other things. she doesn't pull any punches, but she was the first to speak in reply to this historic vote from the u.s. chair inside the general assembly and she said, look, pushing a green button inside the general assembly hall is not going to achieve middle east peace, this resolution really does not create a reality of a state. there is no state for the palestinians on the ground. it's counterproductive, there will be more obstacles. i'm sure shue knew that many people would be watching not just in the middle east but also on capitol hill where she will face potentially a nomination battle which is already under way. >> all right, richard roth, live for us at the u.n. in new york. thank you for that. >>> and, by the way, the israeli government spokesperson called the u.n. vote on the palestinian authority, quote, political theater. but the palestinian authority chief negotiator says the new status eliminates israeli justifications for building settlements in the disputed areas of east jerusalem and the west bank. ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevro
to universities. they focus on the violence and syria and the challenges each jet phases going forward. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i am bill clifford, president and ceo of world boston. as we head into the ultimate panel, assessing the aftermath of the arabs bring, please allow me to think todd culpeper, president and ceo of the world affairs council of america, his crack staff, national council chair, lori murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am awash in debt it is time to make good on those obligations to each year on the panel, who i'm honored to present. i have had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i am telling you a way overdue invitation to our counsel downtown. the professor is a senior fellow at the sovran center at brookings institution, a distinguished former adviser to my current adviser to many government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and a prolific and best-selling author let me quote from the top of his website at the university of maryland
for most of the past decade were syria and iran. the leadership was damascus. that got totally destroyed because hamas is part of the broader muslim brotherhood network in the middle east as morsi is one of the leaders of the egyptian muslim brotherhood so hamas the palestinian brotherhood and the muslim brotherhood in syria is the single biggest group in the political if not military opposition to assets so the relationship between hamas and syria is destroyed. the relationship between hamas and iran barely exists. iran does have ties to other smaller militant groups in gaza. >> jennifer: hussein are you saying -- >> does maintain some relations with hamas but they're not close. you're absolutely right though to point out that what all of this is doing to the p.a., the palestinian authority and the plo, western friendly and interested in peace agreement with israel, not interested in a fight to the death or armed struggle. they essentially have gotten into a very huge pickle over the past year because a year ago
of syria. a video showing the aftermath of an air strike that purportedly hit a playground full of children. it comes as the assad regime launches a new wave of attacks across the country. we'll have an update from a photo journalist who spent eight days inside syria straight ahead on "360." for their clients' futures.ial d helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! thanks. with two times the points on dining in restaurants,? you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with th
approach. and then there's the issue of syria. please say some words about what you see as the next steps with regard to iran, how do we see that unfolding in the time ahead, and then what's the way forward with syria? >> yeah. three things. one, you know, the arab spring turned out to be less spring. probably the better term is the arab awakening, and we're going to go through springs and winters and summers and falls, and it's going to vary country to country, and it's going to take a long time. but look, it was inevitable, unavoidable and actually a good thing that the people of the arab world should start taking some responsibility for their future. and there's just no going back. and it is very much in our interest how these awakenings come out and that they result in societies that are democratic, that are producing a better life for their people, and we should do everything we can in a smart way recognizing we're not so popular in the middle east right now to try to help get that outcome. there are a couple big threats to that. one is syria, and i'm more worried about syria in term
or syria you will see that in each of these cases there are significant cases funding and model was hard to do. people like to fight the eastern european case because it was successful. the problem there is there wasn't a nato membership in the e.u. but helped to really drive that political role and meet the commitment of the government to undertake the reform. certainly for a country like tunisia. what they're looking at interestingly enough are the cases of south korea, taiwan and south africa as examples of places that have undergone a similar authoritarian transitions to the space rule, particular emphasis on the police and internal capability. >> i'm very glad you mentioned those last few cases that may in fact pulled out some opportunities from learning because if we hadn't integrated that possibility into the way this group responded to the question i would have underscored just how potentially significance the absence of prior model is for the securities sector reform in the arab world because it causes a great deal about the limited validity of what we often think about as best
bogus items. syria used distraction of fighting between israel and palestinians to resupply government troops in syria. correspondent leland vittert has the evidence. >> bretevidence >> reporter: they have been firing off and appearing ready for battle. the western intelligence sources tell fox news the men are ire rainian revolutionary guard troops coming to help bashar assad in the syria long civil war. they have exploited the attention on syria to ramp up the flight. often sending ton of ammunition, weapon and equipment multiple times a week. they are flying via rocky air space. the u.s. put pressure on iraq. iraq is inspecting the planes but sources say it's done on the return flight. when the plane is empty to appease the u.s. keep the flight coming. 18 months since the civil war. deflection from the syrian army means that assad has less well-trained men. >> recent rebel takeover have robbed the soldiers of equipment. and the army is running low on ammunition. >> while diplomatic pressure from united states is the only thing to stop iran shipments via iraqi air space, in israel th
. thank you so much. let's take a quick break. when we come back the latest on the civil war in syria including a report from one city at the center of the conflict. later, would be millionaires line up for a chance at tonight's historic powerball lottery drawing. this is the "cbs morning news." powerball lottery drawing. this is the "cbs morning news." or visit exelonpatchoffer2.com. cool, you found it. wow. nice place. yeah. [ chuckles ] the family thinks i'm out shipping these. smooth move. you used priority mail flat-rate boxes. if it fits, it ships for a low, flat rate. paid for postage online and arranged a free pickup. and i'm gonna track them online, too. nice. between those boxes and this place, i'm totally staying sane this year. do i smell snickerdoodles? maybe. [ timer dings ] gotta go. [ male announcer ] priority mail flat rate boxes. online pricing starts at $5.15. only from the postal service. >>> raging floodwaters in england have left nearly 1,000 families homeless. rescuers going door-to-door found the body of a woman inside her flooded home in north wales on tuesday
where the fiercest fighting in syria's civil war took place. and outrage as victims of sandy discover there are places for them to stay, but nobody told them. >>> as a burn survivor, you think you're all alone. you think you're the only person that has scars on your face or has, you know, skin graphs on your hands. we all have a story. i joined the united states army in 2002 and deployed to iraq. i was driving a humvee and when my friend went over a land mine i was in a medically induced coma. by the time i came out third degree burns on my head, face, arms, hands, portion of my back, portion of my legs. while i was recovering, i remember asking one of the social workers how can i help burn survivors. she said there's a great organization called the phoenix society. they're teaching them different ways to kind of cope. i went to this conference. everyone had big smiles on their face. i made a choice i was going to be positive every single day. and i'm using this positivity to give back to other people. >> please welcome a former u.s. army soldier and ins frags i prags to all of us and
. dennis ross and james jeffrey address the unrest in syria and their concerns about egypt house and government. this is an hour and 35 minutes. clucks a good afternoon. welcome to the washington institution -- institute. i'm delighted to see all of you today. i think the interest in foreign policy and the wake of our presidential election is evident by the standing room only crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle that may have an impact on the policy process. so, i take it that it is a good sign that there is a much interest in the foreign-policy process by your presence here today. i think the transition from a first to second on the administration may begin the day after election, but it does not end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the new old team goes through the inevitable time of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues
there are rumblings of a major shift in american involvement in the crisis in syria. by all accounts, this is a very messy and lethal civil war with no easy solution, especially for outside countries who would like to help but can't afford the immense risks that come attached. now today the "new york times" is reporting that the united states may start directly arming the rebels in syria. that's opposed to what we're already doing, sending humanitarian and intelligence support. and all of this comes as the rebels appear to be getting somewhat stronger. take a look at this video that was shot by cnn. it is the wreckage of a fighter jet that syrian rebels shot down. the third such aircraft that the rebels say they have shot down in just the last 24 hours. and, of course, we don't know yet where the anti aircraft weapons that were used actually came from. cnn's nick paton walsh was there and joins us live now with the latest in beirut. nick, i don't know if there's any feeling on the ground from our reporters there who are having such trouble just reporting from that country, because we're not allowed
their airspace to rearm syria's president in his fight against the rebels. leland vittert has been on this story now. he joins us live from jerusalem. leland, what do we know here? >> reporter: martha, it is no secret that iran wants to keep president bashar assad in power there in syria but they're becoming increasingly sneaky how they are getting him weapons, ammunition, other things to continue the fight against his own people. western intelligence sources confirm this video shows cargo planes that have landed from iran inside syria flown by iraqi airspace. despite very intense u.s. pressure to stop those flights. they land. they off-load and the people you are watching our sources tell us are iran revolutionary guard corps members helping the syrian regime. according to our sources the revolutionary guard used all media attention that happened in gaza, no one is talking about syria for two weeks to increase the flights significantly and continue to supply president assad because they say he is running out of ammunition, especially artillery shells for being able to hit syrian cities. what we
? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wanted him to depart. he is an ally of iran. he has not only killed 40,000 of his own people, he's tried to make a secret nuclear military program, he's helped in providing tens and tens of thousands of missiles to terrorists in lebanon and gaza. he is a loose cannon. we want him gone. we want to see a democratic and peaceful in syria. >> what about the u.s. army corps of engineers is about to build a top secret underground facility at an israeli air base outside of tel aviv. >> know nothing about it whatsoever. >> you don't know nothing
syria into the mix. israel fired shells into the syrian border after receiving some mortar fire itself in the golan heights. it doesn't have the time or energy to invest in syria, but if things spiral out of control, how much pressure does that also put on israel to act? >> i think the israelis have been pretty clear, including in the last few days, that they have absolutely no interest in getting involved in what's going on in syria. there's so many different reasons for that. first of all, it's an intractable conflict. beyond that, none of the actors involved are pro-israelis. the worst thing they can do is get involved in the conflict and give the regime some kinld of political cover saying we're not just fighting against revolutionaries but against israeli spies and the massad. from israel's perspective they have nuch problems dealing with gaza. the last thing that they need is to add to that plate, and what can be gained by getting involved in syria from the israel's perspective? whoever wins in syria from israel's perspective is the enemy. >> that's right. thanks so much. >> than
is further away from iran and from syria. the more radical governments in the region. closer to egypt and qatar who are less radical, re western oriented, more pro-american and with open channels to israel. >> rose: so what do you think is going to happen? >> i think a new cease-fire will be put in place. i hope it will happen within the next 24 hours to prevent and avoid and do without the ground invasion with its deadly cast and then whoever takes t place of jbarras the new leader of hamas will have to impose a cease-fire. while at the same time israel will have to let go some of its blockade of gaza. and i think both sides will try the best face-saving formulas which they can deploy in that situation. >> rose: aluf, thank you so much for joining us. >> good evening. >> rose: aluf benn is the executive editor-in-chief of the israeli newspaper "ha'aretz." we'll be back in a moment. stay with us. >> rose: the fallout from the benghazi attack tonights, the death of chris stevens and three other americans were blamed on a spontaneous reaction to a video. it became clear what transpired
it makes the argument it wants to be made gee aren't we victims when they're not. syria which you have been writing about with increasing accuracy, saying we must do something. have we forgotten about syria as the battle between israel and hamas has grown? >> you hit the nail on the head, eliot. in the final analysis, that's exactly what iran wants. iran hopes to benefit from this crisis and that's exactly what it wants. attention taken off of syria. and having the arab world come to the rescue of its proxy puppet hamas. >> eliot: ambassador marc ginsburg, thanks for coming on the show, sharing your insights even if it is a mess. >> sure. >> eliot: the election means a new day and a new deal on the fiscal cliff. robert reich joins us coming up ahead. the first 1,000 days of human life can cause irreparable harm to our brains and our bodies. that's why "current" has partnered with "1,000 days" to help spread the word & combat a problem that ultimately effects all of us. to see how you can help go to current dot com. brought to you
on the ground? syria, the centrifuges continue to spin in tehran and, we have to start facing up to what is one of the prime reasons why there is the kind of unrest we are seeing throughout the middle east. >> chris: let me just button-up the morsi thing. what should our demand be of him? >> stop. stop. renounce the statement, and the move that he just made. allow the judiciary to function. if the judiciary is flawed in some way, then, that is an illness that can be cured over time but, absolutely, to assume this kind of power is unacceptable to the united states of america and, then, we can outline what actions might be taken. but, first, condemn it. >> chris: let's talk a little bit, you already led us in that direction, to the cease-fire, the fragile cease-fire worked out this week between israel and hamas. how fragile is it? what do you make of it? and, you know, we saw the longer-range iranian missiles that had been smuggled into gaza and were fired at tel aviv and jerusalem, which raises the question, if israel takes action against iran's nuclear program, what is the threat they face from
suddenly it turned into the epicenter of syria's civil war. armed opposition gunmen against the syrian military machine. after months of ferocious fighting, the syrian army did manage to take back babr amr, but at terrible cost. even now only 5% of the residents have returned and the fight has just moved down the road. but to get to it, we had to take a surreal trip through a fully functioning business district crowded with shoppers and students then down a street. the next front line was marked by tanks and syrian soldiers. a young captain who wanted to be known only as omar offered to show us around. look at this. wow. months of fighting have shattered this part of the old city. >> this street, snipers. >> reporter: now? >> no. >> reporter: omar gestured to a curtain hung in an alley to block the snipers' view. even so, when soldiers pass the place, they duck. just behind these battle-scarred buildings rebel fighters are still in control. we climbed inside to try and have a look. there's not a lot moving out there. we might be able to see more from this hole but they say it's too big
tons of, quote, bank notes into syria. u.s. and european sanctions include a ban on syrian currency in an attempt to slow the violence that's killed thousands of people. syria and russian officials have so far not responded to the reports. >>> overseas tens of thousands are rallying today in cairo's tahrir square protesting what they view as a blatant power grab by president mohamed horsey. with tensions mounting yesterday, morsi appeared to soften his controversial attempt to award himself near absolute power above the reach of the law. in a vaguely worded statement, morsi spokesman backtracked slightly saying that only acts of sovereignty would be immune from oversight. >>> well, u.s. consumers went big this weekend for small business saturday. millions of holiday shoppers spent a total of $5.5 billion during the third annual local business shopping event. mika spent half of that in the south of france. and that's not even counted in that tally. for more on the holiday shopping season and the impact on the economy, let's go right now to cnbc's steve sedwood live in london with us.
, it was discussed about president reagan going to vicksburg. he said i look at the congo and afghanistan and syria and see dispa despair. the problem in the middle east is despair. i think the problem is and i don't know how you get around it, the president has to bring it aboard. netanyahu suffers from the problem mitt romney did, they see the world from their perspective. they don't see the greater world being the numbers and population and the future. they are not prepared for it. they are hunkered down. israel cannot continue to be hunkered down and survive. they are going to be outnumbered. >> they have been outnumbered for a long time. there's fear that it is free and greater danger. >> iron dome was beautiful. it was president obama, the united states helped fund it. >> a missile defense, the rocket defense weapon system that was able to shoot down rockets. >> 85% accuracy at best. >> hold on. i want to talk about this and what the u.s. government can do to bring about a two-state solution, if that is the aim after this. think again. black friday prices are still here. instore and online, r
president reagan go to bitberg. he said i would look at the congo and afghanistan and i looked at syria, despair, dispair can never be the answer, you always have to have hope. we still have to have hope. and the problem in the middle east does appear to be despair. i think the problem is the president has to try to bring about some type of accord. is that netanyahu suffers from the same problem that romney did. they see the world only from their perspective. and it's from their view and they don't see the great earth world. the greater world being what's the numbers and the population and the future. they're not prepared for it they're hunkered down. and israel can't continue to be hunkered down and survive because they're going to be outnumbered by -- >> they've been outnumbered for a long time and there's a lot of fear that the tumult they bring is creating a greater danger. >> iron dome was beautiful. that was president obama and the united states helped fund the iron dome. >> a missile defense sort of rocket defense weapons system that was able to shoot down rockets that were incom
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